New Customs self-service kiosks may cut clearance time in half at Sea-Tac Airport

Staff writerJanuary 10, 2014 

New Automated Passport Control kiosks at Sea-Tac

SEA-TAC AIRPORT

International travelers weary after a long flight have a new way to clear Customs at Sea-Tac Airport.

The Port of Seattle, Sea-Tac's owner, and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Thursday introduced 14 new Automated Passport Control kiosks at the airport.  Those kiosks are designed to cut the entry process in half for eligible U.S. and Canadian citizens.

Sea-Tac is the fifth U.S. airport to have those kiosks installed, said the airport.

"This is the latest in our cooperative effort with Customs and Border Protection to provide simple, easy-to-use and customer-friendly solutions to make the traveling experience as positive as possible," said Charles Goedken, manager of International Services at the airport.

"This is necessary to meet the demands of the rapidly increasing number of international flights we are seeing at Sea-Tac," he said.

Sea-Tac has seen its international traffic jump by nearly 10 percent in each of the last two years.  The airport now offers non-stop flights to Tokyo's two airports, to Osaka, Shanghai, Beijing, Seoul and Taipei in Asia. Delta Airlines will add two more flights to Asia from Sea-Tac next year to Hong Kong and Seoul.

In Europe, Sea-Tac has non-stop flights to Paris, Frankfurt, London, Amsterdam and Reykjavik in Iceland. Emirates Airlines connects Sea-Tac to Dubai.  In addition to those flights, numerous flights link Sea-Tac to Mexico and Canada.

To use the new kiosks, eligible passengers will proceed directly to the Automated Passport Control where they will follow on-screen instructions to scan their passports and to answer questions about goods they are bringing into the country. They will receive a receipt from the machine which they will present to a Customs and Border Protection officer.

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