FILE - In this Sept. 7, 2012 file photo, the research vessel Ocearch has set her anchor as the crew begins their search for great white sharks on the Atlantic Ocean, spending two to three weeks tagging sharks and collecting blood and tissue samples off the coast of Chatham, Mass. After tagging the sharks real-time satellite tracks the shark each time its dorsal fin breaks the surface, plotting its location on a map. Researchers in Massachusetts say great white sharks in the Atlantic Ocean are venturing offshore farther, with more frequency and at greater depths than previously known. The findings were published Sept. 29, 2017, in the scientific journal Marine Ecology Progress Series.
FILE - In this Sept. 7, 2012 file photo, the research vessel Ocearch has set her anchor as the crew begins their search for great white sharks on the Atlantic Ocean, spending two to three weeks tagging sharks and collecting blood and tissue samples off the coast of Chatham, Mass. After tagging the sharks real-time satellite tracks the shark each time its dorsal fin breaks the surface, plotting its location on a map. Researchers in Massachusetts say great white sharks in the Atlantic Ocean are venturing offshore farther, with more frequency and at greater depths than previously known. The findings were published Sept. 29, 2017, in the scientific journal Marine Ecology Progress Series. Stephan Savoia, File AP Photo
FILE - In this Sept. 7, 2012 file photo, the research vessel Ocearch has set her anchor as the crew begins their search for great white sharks on the Atlantic Ocean, spending two to three weeks tagging sharks and collecting blood and tissue samples off the coast of Chatham, Mass. After tagging the sharks real-time satellite tracks the shark each time its dorsal fin breaks the surface, plotting its location on a map. Researchers in Massachusetts say great white sharks in the Atlantic Ocean are venturing offshore farther, with more frequency and at greater depths than previously known. The findings were published Sept. 29, 2017, in the scientific journal Marine Ecology Progress Series. Stephan Savoia, File AP Photo

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