Surrounded by Marcia Brown Martel and "Sixties Scoop" survivors, Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett responds to a question during a news conference on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa, Canada, on Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. Bennett announced the Canadian government has agreed to pay compensation to indigenous people who were taken from their homes and adopted into non-indigenous families, in what's known as the "Sixties Scoop."  Lead plaintiff Brown Martel, who was taken by child welfare officials and adopted by a non-native family, called events the "stealing of children."
Surrounded by Marcia Brown Martel and "Sixties Scoop" survivors, Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett responds to a question during a news conference on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa, Canada, on Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. Bennett announced the Canadian government has agreed to pay compensation to indigenous people who were taken from their homes and adopted into non-indigenous families, in what's known as the "Sixties Scoop." Lead plaintiff Brown Martel, who was taken by child welfare officials and adopted by a non-native family, called events the "stealing of children." The Canadian Press via AP Adrian Wyld
Surrounded by Marcia Brown Martel and "Sixties Scoop" survivors, Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett responds to a question during a news conference on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa, Canada, on Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. Bennett announced the Canadian government has agreed to pay compensation to indigenous people who were taken from their homes and adopted into non-indigenous families, in what's known as the "Sixties Scoop." Lead plaintiff Brown Martel, who was taken by child welfare officials and adopted by a non-native family, called events the "stealing of children." The Canadian Press via AP Adrian Wyld

Canada pays indigenous people taken from their homes

October 06, 2017 2:49 PM

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