In this Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017 photo, former coal miner Chuck Nelson looks out on the Brushy Fork impoundment in Raleigh County, in southern West Virginia, an estimated 2.8 billion gallon coal slurry containing sludge and chemicals from nearby surface mines. He says the slurries pollute the groundwater and contribute to high rates of cancer and other illnesses among the people living nearby.
In this Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017 photo, former coal miner Chuck Nelson looks out on the Brushy Fork impoundment in Raleigh County, in southern West Virginia, an estimated 2.8 billion gallon coal slurry containing sludge and chemicals from nearby surface mines. He says the slurries pollute the groundwater and contribute to high rates of cancer and other illnesses among the people living nearby. Michael Virtanen AP Photo
In this Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017 photo, former coal miner Chuck Nelson looks out on the Brushy Fork impoundment in Raleigh County, in southern West Virginia, an estimated 2.8 billion gallon coal slurry containing sludge and chemicals from nearby surface mines. He says the slurries pollute the groundwater and contribute to high rates of cancer and other illnesses among the people living nearby. Michael Virtanen AP Photo

Frustration sets in after coal mine health study suspended

November 11, 2017 06:51 AM

UPDATED November 11, 2017 06:52 AM

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