This undated photo provided by the U.S. Forest Service shows a yellow-cedar tree growing east of the Cascade Crest in Washington state. A study documenting mortality of yellow cedar trees in Alaska and British Columbia concludes that the future is gloomy for the iconic species valued for its commercial and cultural values. Researchers say additional mortality is likely over the next 50 years as the climate warms and rain replaces snow.
This undated photo provided by the U.S. Forest Service shows a yellow-cedar tree growing east of the Cascade Crest in Washington state. A study documenting mortality of yellow cedar trees in Alaska and British Columbia concludes that the future is gloomy for the iconic species valued for its commercial and cultural values. Researchers say additional mortality is likely over the next 50 years as the climate warms and rain replaces snow. U.S. Forest Service AP
This undated photo provided by the U.S. Forest Service shows a yellow-cedar tree growing east of the Cascade Crest in Washington state. A study documenting mortality of yellow cedar trees in Alaska and British Columbia concludes that the future is gloomy for the iconic species valued for its commercial and cultural values. Researchers say additional mortality is likely over the next 50 years as the climate warms and rain replaces snow. U.S. Forest Service AP

Study documents cedar species’ decline due to climate warming

January 06, 2017 02:37 PM

UPDATED January 07, 2017 05:28 PM

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