Bertha, the massive tunnel boring machine that drilled a nearly 2-mile tunnel to replace the 60-year-old Alaskan Way Viaduct, is shown in a photo taken with a fisheye wide-angle lens in July 2013 before it moved underground later in the month in Seattle.
Bertha, the massive tunnel boring machine that drilled a nearly 2-mile tunnel to replace the 60-year-old Alaskan Way Viaduct, is shown in a photo taken with a fisheye wide-angle lens in July 2013 before it moved underground later in the month in Seattle. Ted S. Warren The Associated Press
Bertha, the massive tunnel boring machine that drilled a nearly 2-mile tunnel to replace the 60-year-old Alaskan Way Viaduct, is shown in a photo taken with a fisheye wide-angle lens in July 2013 before it moved underground later in the month in Seattle. Ted S. Warren The Associated Press

The end is near for Bertha: After nearly 2 miles in 4 years, tunnel machine about to break through

April 02, 2017 7:17 AM

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