Posing in the “Sale House” of the Fort Nisqually Living History Museum, David Jepsen, right, and David Norberg co-authored a book on Pacific Northwest history in which the fort is mentioned frequently as being vital to the fur trade and local pioneer life in the 1850s. Jepsen is a history professor at Tacoma Community College and Norberg is a Green River Community College professor.
Posing in the “Sale House” of the Fort Nisqually Living History Museum, David Jepsen, right, and David Norberg co-authored a book on Pacific Northwest history in which the fort is mentioned frequently as being vital to the fur trade and local pioneer life in the 1850s. Jepsen is a history professor at Tacoma Community College and Norberg is a Green River Community College professor. Drew Perine dperine@thenewstribune.com
Posing in the “Sale House” of the Fort Nisqually Living History Museum, David Jepsen, right, and David Norberg co-authored a book on Pacific Northwest history in which the fort is mentioned frequently as being vital to the fur trade and local pioneer life in the 1850s. Jepsen is a history professor at Tacoma Community College and Norberg is a Green River Community College professor. Drew Perine dperine@thenewstribune.com

First new PNW history book in 30 years offers new perspectives on regional history

May 04, 2017 9:55 AM

More Videos

  • Gig Harbor's new lift station, restrooms and view platform at Skansie Park

    The new lift station in Gig Harbor includes new restrooms and the repositioning of the fisherman statue in a new plaza beside the Jerisich Public Dock and Skansie Brother's Park.