Connie Chapman, a veteran who was the director of the Wounded Warrior Project office in Seattle for two years, at a friend’s home in Eatonville. In its swift rise, the Wounded Warrior Project has embraced aggressive styles of fundraising, marketing and personnel management that have caused many current and former employees to question whether it has drifted from its original mission. “People could spend money on the most ridiculous thing and no one batted an eye,” said Chapman of the nonprofit’s spending.
Connie Chapman, a veteran who was the director of the Wounded Warrior Project office in Seattle for two years, at a friend’s home in Eatonville. In its swift rise, the Wounded Warrior Project has embraced aggressive styles of fundraising, marketing and personnel management that have caused many current and former employees to question whether it has drifted from its original mission. “People could spend money on the most ridiculous thing and no one batted an eye,” said Chapman of the nonprofit’s spending. EVAN MCGLINN The New York Times
Connie Chapman, a veteran who was the director of the Wounded Warrior Project office in Seattle for two years, at a friend’s home in Eatonville. In its swift rise, the Wounded Warrior Project has embraced aggressive styles of fundraising, marketing and personnel management that have caused many current and former employees to question whether it has drifted from its original mission. “People could spend money on the most ridiculous thing and no one batted an eye,” said Chapman of the nonprofit’s spending. EVAN MCGLINN The New York Times

Wounded Warrior Project spends lavishly on itself, ex-employees say

January 27, 2016 07:17 AM

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