FILE - In this July 25, 2003 file photo, Sister Ardeth Platte, second from left, hugs an unidentified supporter, left, as sisters Jackie Hudson, third from left, and Carol Gilbert, right, look on as the three Dominican nuns head into federal court in downtown Denver for sentencing. The women were convicted in April of obstructing the national defense and damaging government property for swinging a hammer at the silo and smearing their blood on it in the form of a cross. Fifteen years later, they are returning to deliver the message that nuclear disarmament is at hand. "We're in an extremely dangerous time," Platte said. "A strike could be launched from Colorado within 15 minutes and go 7,000 miles to its target within half an hour. It would be total devastation." On Oct. 9, 2017, they'll present to Peterson Air Force Base personnel a copy of the new United Nations' Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.
FILE - In this July 25, 2003 file photo, Sister Ardeth Platte, second from left, hugs an unidentified supporter, left, as sisters Jackie Hudson, third from left, and Carol Gilbert, right, look on as the three Dominican nuns head into federal court in downtown Denver for sentencing. The women were convicted in April of obstructing the national defense and damaging government property for swinging a hammer at the silo and smearing their blood on it in the form of a cross. Fifteen years later, they are returning to deliver the message that nuclear disarmament is at hand. "We're in an extremely dangerous time," Platte said. "A strike could be launched from Colorado within 15 minutes and go 7,000 miles to its target within half an hour. It would be total devastation." On Oct. 9, 2017, they'll present to Peterson Air Force Base personnel a copy of the new United Nations' Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. David Zalubowski, File AP Photo
FILE - In this July 25, 2003 file photo, Sister Ardeth Platte, second from left, hugs an unidentified supporter, left, as sisters Jackie Hudson, third from left, and Carol Gilbert, right, look on as the three Dominican nuns head into federal court in downtown Denver for sentencing. The women were convicted in April of obstructing the national defense and damaging government property for swinging a hammer at the silo and smearing their blood on it in the form of a cross. Fifteen years later, they are returning to deliver the message that nuclear disarmament is at hand. "We're in an extremely dangerous time," Platte said. "A strike could be launched from Colorado within 15 minutes and go 7,000 miles to its target within half an hour. It would be total devastation." On Oct. 9, 2017, they'll present to Peterson Air Force Base personnel a copy of the new United Nations' Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. David Zalubowski, File AP Photo

Anti-war nuns to bring message of nuclear disarmament

October 07, 2017 7:24 AM

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