Lee Boyd Malvo, left, is flanked by his attorneys in a circuit court in Virginia in 2004. Malvo struck a deal in which he avoided the death penalty and was sentenced as an adult to life without parole for one of his D.C. Sniper attacks. Because he was still a child at the time of his shooting spree 15 years ago, Malvo will now be granted a resentencing hearing.
Lee Boyd Malvo, left, is flanked by his attorneys in a circuit court in Virginia in 2004. Malvo struck a deal in which he avoided the death penalty and was sentenced as an adult to life without parole for one of his D.C. Sniper attacks. Because he was still a child at the time of his shooting spree 15 years ago, Malvo will now be granted a resentencing hearing. Mike Morones AP file photo
Lee Boyd Malvo, left, is flanked by his attorneys in a circuit court in Virginia in 2004. Malvo struck a deal in which he avoided the death penalty and was sentenced as an adult to life without parole for one of his D.C. Sniper attacks. Because he was still a child at the time of his shooting spree 15 years ago, Malvo will now be granted a resentencing hearing. Mike Morones AP file photo

Opinion

New hope for young felons, even a sniper named Malvo

May 30, 2017 3:32 PM

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