Workers sort through electronic waste that was collected from a slum in Nairobi, Kenya, and brought in for recycling. The amount of electronic waste generated globally last year represents more than 15 pounds for every living person, according to the U.N. Environmental Program, with much of that e-waste exported to developing countries like India and Kenya in the form of used goods.
Workers sort through electronic waste that was collected from a slum in Nairobi, Kenya, and brought in for recycling. The amount of electronic waste generated globally last year represents more than 15 pounds for every living person, according to the U.N. Environmental Program, with much of that e-waste exported to developing countries like India and Kenya in the form of used goods. Ben Curtis The Associated Press file, 2014
Workers sort through electronic waste that was collected from a slum in Nairobi, Kenya, and brought in for recycling. The amount of electronic waste generated globally last year represents more than 15 pounds for every living person, according to the U.N. Environmental Program, with much of that e-waste exported to developing countries like India and Kenya in the form of used goods. Ben Curtis The Associated Press file, 2014

E-waste crisis looms

September 04, 2015 04:42 AM

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