Cassiana Severino holds daughter Melisa Vitoria, born with microcephaly in Recife, Brazil. The Zika virus, believed to cause the condition when a pregnant woman is infected, is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which is well-adapted to humans, thrives in people's homes and can breed in even a bottle cap's-worth of stagnant water.
Cassiana Severino holds daughter Melisa Vitoria, born with microcephaly in Recife, Brazil. The Zika virus, believed to cause the condition when a pregnant woman is infected, is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which is well-adapted to humans, thrives in people's homes and can breed in even a bottle cap's-worth of stagnant water. Felipe Dana AP
Cassiana Severino holds daughter Melisa Vitoria, born with microcephaly in Recife, Brazil. The Zika virus, believed to cause the condition when a pregnant woman is infected, is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which is well-adapted to humans, thrives in people's homes and can breed in even a bottle cap's-worth of stagnant water. Felipe Dana AP

Zika puts Latin American women in an untenable position

February 03, 2016 07:12 AM