Joy Roop, of Fairfax, Va., pushes her two carts while shopping at the Fort Myer commissary in Arlington, Va., in 1996. For the eight million U.S. military service members around the world, shopping at low-cost, on-base commissaries is a key benefit, but sometimes, also a big headache. Now, the federal government is launching a program to try to end inconvenient hours, long lines and poorly stocked shelves.
Joy Roop, of Fairfax, Va., pushes her two carts while shopping at the Fort Myer commissary in Arlington, Va., in 1996. For the eight million U.S. military service members around the world, shopping at low-cost, on-base commissaries is a key benefit, but sometimes, also a big headache. Now, the federal government is launching a program to try to end inconvenient hours, long lines and poorly stocked shelves. Denis Paquin AP file, 1996
Joy Roop, of Fairfax, Va., pushes her two carts while shopping at the Fort Myer commissary in Arlington, Va., in 1996. For the eight million U.S. military service members around the world, shopping at low-cost, on-base commissaries is a key benefit, but sometimes, also a big headache. Now, the federal government is launching a program to try to end inconvenient hours, long lines and poorly stocked shelves. Denis Paquin AP file, 1996