FILE - This Friday, June 19, 2015 file photo shows the Department of Transportation Federal Aviation Administration building, in Washington. For more than six decades, the Federal Aviation Administration has relied on employees of airplane manufacturers to do government-required safety inspections as planes are being designed or assembled. But critics say the system, dubbed the "Designee Program," is too cozy as company employees do work for an agency charged with keeping the skies safe while being paid by an industry that the FAA is regulating.
FILE - This Friday, June 19, 2015 file photo shows the Department of Transportation Federal Aviation Administration building, in Washington. For more than six decades, the Federal Aviation Administration has relied on employees of airplane manufacturers to do government-required safety inspections as planes are being designed or assembled. But critics say the system, dubbed the "Designee Program," is too cozy as company employees do work for an agency charged with keeping the skies safe while being paid by an industry that the FAA is regulating. Andrew Harnik, File AP Photo
FILE - This Friday, June 19, 2015 file photo shows the Department of Transportation Federal Aviation Administration building, in Washington. For more than six decades, the Federal Aviation Administration has relied on employees of airplane manufacturers to do government-required safety inspections as planes are being designed or assembled. But critics say the system, dubbed the "Designee Program," is too cozy as company employees do work for an agency charged with keeping the skies safe while being paid by an industry that the FAA is regulating. Andrew Harnik, File AP Photo