Local

Local tribes show solidarity with Standing Rock protesters through art

Nisqually Tribe unveils statue honoring Standing Rock warriors

A wood carving by Salish artist Ed Archie NoiseCat depicting a Native American woman standing in defense of the water will be given as a gift to the Standing Rock Sioux Nation.
Up Next
A wood carving by Salish artist Ed Archie NoiseCat depicting a Native American woman standing in defense of the water will be given as a gift to the Standing Rock Sioux Nation.

Local tribes showed solidarity with the Standing Sioux on Saturday, unveiling a sculpture by artist Ed Archie NoiseCat during the Nisqually Indian Tribe’s annual powwow.

NoiseCat’s sculpture depicts a warrior woman standing above a black coiled snake devouring the bones of Sioux ancestors. NoiseCat said Saturday that he hopes the piece will inspire other nations to join the fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

“With all of the people struggling to hold on to what little we have left, I thought it would be best to do what I do,” NoiseCat said. “And I make art.”

The piece, titled “Mni Wiconi” which means “Water is Life,” stands about 11 feet tall and is made of Alaskan yellow cedar.

NoiseCat said the idea for the piece came to him about three months ago, after listening to news about the protest at Standing Rock.

He wanted to honor both the native and non-native water protectors.

He said he featured a female warrior because local native cultures have always valued women.

“Having a woman on top of this seemed like a really important symbol,” NoiseCat said.

NoiseCat is an enrolled member of the Canim Lake Band, in British Columbia.

Last year, about 30 members of the local canoe family traveled to North Dakota to join the protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Some members of the canoe family are still there.

The powwow was to resume Sunday . at the Nisqually Youth and Community Center, 1937 Lashi St. NE.

Amelia Dickson: 360-754-5445, @Amelia_Oly

  Comments