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Motion seeks preliminary injunction against Trump’s transgender military ban

Staff Sgt. Cathrine Schmid, shown at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, is a plaintiff in a lawsuit contending President Donald Trump’s proposed ban on transgender soldiers violates their rights.
Staff Sgt. Cathrine Schmid, shown at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, is a plaintiff in a lawsuit contending President Donald Trump’s proposed ban on transgender soldiers violates their rights. Courtesy

A motion was filed in federal court on Thursday seeking an injunction to halt the government from moving forward with any ban on the ability of transgender individuals to serve in the armed forces.

In the motion requesting relief that was filed in the U.S. District Court’s Western District of Washington, the plaintiffs claim they are likely to suffer irreparable harm in the absence of preliminary relief and that a preliminary injunction is in the public interest.

The suit — which was one of two filed last month — against President Donald Trump and other administration officials came after the president tweeted in July that transgender people would not be allowed to serve in the military in any capacity due, in part, to health-care costs.

In Washington state, the civil-rights organization, Lambda Legal, and OutServe-SLDN, a group dedicated to ending discrimination against military personnel on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity, filed on behalf of several transgender plaintiffs.

The plaintiffs include: Ryan Karnoski, a 22-year-old Seattle social worker who wants to become a military officer; Cathrine Schmid, a 33-year-old Army staff sergeant at Joint Base Lewis-McChord who has applied to become a warrant officer; and Drew Layne, a 17-year-old high-school student from Texas who wants to join the Air Force.

The second lawsuit was filed in Baltimore federal court by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of six transgender people serving in several branches of the military.

Both lawsuits claim the ban violates the nation’s constitutional guarantee of equal protection and due process under the Fifth Amendment.

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