Gateway: Living

Slater: Arrival of spring coincides with a wedding ceremony to remember

Columnist Colleen Slater’s oldest granddaughter recently got married. Her wedding cake featured decorations resembling a Spartan race, including mud to crawl through, rocks, trees, a waterfall, a climbing rope, ladders and other obstacles. The cake plate sat on a crosswise slice of a tree, bark edge included.
Columnist Colleen Slater’s oldest granddaughter recently got married. Her wedding cake featured decorations resembling a Spartan race, including mud to crawl through, rocks, trees, a waterfall, a climbing rope, ladders and other obstacles. The cake plate sat on a crosswise slice of a tree, bark edge included. Courtesy

Recently returned from a “mini-vacation” to Maryland, the question arises: When you take a week off, why does it take more than a week to “catch up?”

One of the main things this time of year is the daily observance of what new things are blooming, along with weeding and trimming chores that weren’t done because of the extended rainy season this spring.

So many new shrubs and flowers had popped into bloom during our week’s absence I made a list of them. A few had bloomed before we left, but the day after we came home, I counted over 30 different flowers and shrubs blooming, which doesn’t count the individual rhododendrons and azaleas.

The main reason for our trip was to attend the wedding of our oldest granddaughter. Alana is her own person, one of a kind, and did not want the traditional wedding.

We gathered at the National Harbor Marina, Oxon Hill, south of D.C. and boarded a cruise boat. The wedding ceremony took place on the open foredeck, followed by a three-hour brunch cruise on the Potomac. Besides immediate family, including grandparents, the guests were friends of the bride and groom, many of whom are involved in the Spartan races Alana and Terry compete in.

Alana did wear a long white gown and her groom, ring-bearer and her dad wore black suits.

She also wore or carried something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue. They danced the first dance as bride and groom and had a lovely tiered bridal cake, except there ends the traditional bits. The cake was beautiful from one side, with swirled white frosting and a bright flower garland down the side.

On the other side, the decoration resembled a Spartan race, including mud to crawl through, rocks, trees, a waterfall, a climbing rope, ladders and other obstacles. The cake plate sat on a crosswise slice of a tree, bark edge included.

We’ve attended some unique weddings, but this is one of the more memorable ones. It was a delightful event and we were pleased to welcome to the family not only another grandson, but a charming 8-year-old great-grandson, too.

Larry Riebow, across the bay, called recently to watch the Dall’s porpoises moving “right in front of your place!” by the time I located hubby and got onto the deck, I only saw one head disappear. However, I did some online checking, and since Larry commented on the seagulls flying above the porpoises, I knew better what to look for.

This morning (Monday) I saw a lot of seagulls on the water in one spot and more flying in the area. Outside I heard the racket of the gulls, then saw shadows under the water and watched one briefly surface. There were at least six of them, perhaps more, that flipped up for air, and dove below again. A first for me.

We see notes about the humpback whale between here and Stretch Island putting on a show, but haven’t been lucky enough to see it ourselves yet.

Vaughn third- and fourth-graders will visit the Key Peninsula Historic Society museum in June to experience “Living History on the Key Peninsula,” provided by KPHS members. This annual excursion shows students some of the activities of pioneer life that took place in this area over 100 years ago.

Graduation time, and I want to say special congratulations to cousin Tacoda Anker for achieving the once thought impossible task of graduating and planning to continue his education! He’ll attend my alma mater, Washington State University. Way to go, Tacoda, your family is proud of you!

  Comments