Crime

What’s the difference between ‘get off my lawn’ and ‘get off my window sill’?

Editor’s note: Compiled from reports to Tacoma police.

Aug. 25: The homeless daughter came home for her mother’s birthday, but the celebration turned ugly.

The dispatch call reported a fight. Officers drove to an apartment in the 700 block of Commerce Street and spoke to the mother, 58.

The mother, who appeared intoxicated, said she allowed her daughter to stay at the apartment and clean up, which meant showering and a little laundry. The daughter, 30, used methamphetamine and hadn’t slept for four days, the mother said.

Earlier, the two had been drinking, the mother said. The daughter abruptly asked, “Why did you do that?”

“What do you mean?” the mother asked, not understanding.

At that point, she said, the daughter flew into a rage, shouting that her mother was trying to control her life. The daughter went into a bedroom and picked up a hammer. The two women struggled, and the mother took the hammer away.

At that point, she said, the daughter flew into a rage, shouting that her mother was trying to control her life. The daughter went into a bedroom and picked up a hammer. The two women struggled, and the mother took the hammer away.

The daughter went into a bedroom and started smashing things, the mother said. The daughter was her youngest child and had been feisty when younger, but never violent.

Officers looked the place over. The house was neat, but the bedroom was trashed. The mother asked for a no-contact order.

A few minutes later, officers found the daughter outside the apartment building. She was arrested and cuffed.

She called her mother an alcoholic who would get drunk on one beer. She said her mother had asked for a sip of her drink. The daughter refused, she said. The daughter said she walked out of the apartment at that point. She denied doing anything and said her mother would lie about her.

The daughter rolled through waves of mood. At times she was calm. At other moments, she cried and got angry. She asked the same questions over and over. She brought up a 10-year-old fight with her mother.

Officers booked the daughter into the Pierce County Jail on suspicion of destruction of property.

Aug. 20: If “get off my lawn” is the universal code for cranky, where does “get off my window sill” fit?

The dispatch call reported a standoff between a group of youths and the residents of an apartment complex. Officers drove to the 3900 block of South Yakima Avenue.

They found a crowd: nine juveniles and and five residents, jawing at each other.

When officers arrived, the youths started walking away. Officers told them to stop and wait while they sorted things out.

Two of them said one of their friends was sitting on a downstairs window sill, “just chilling,” and an old man in a hat came outside and told them to go away. The youths refused, which started an argument. Some said the old man put his cane on the boy’s foot.

Officers spoke to residents, including the man in the hat, 58, who said one of the boys kept sitting on his window sill. The man rapped and told the boy to get off. The boy didn’t. The man stepped outside, he said, and told the boy to stop sitting on his window sill.

“Screw off and mind your own business,” the boy reportedly said.

After a third go-round, the boy and his friends told the older man to back off unless he wanted trouble. The man said the boy grabbed his cane and pushed him with it, saying, “Do you want to get hurt, old man? I’ll bust your face in.”

After a third go-round, the boy and his friends told the older man to back off unless he wanted trouble. The man said the boy grabbed his cane and pushed him with it, saying, “Do you want to get hurt, old man? I’ll bust your face in.”

The man said the boy shoved the cane back at him. He said he wasn’t hurt.

Other residents backed up the man’s story. One said she heard shouting outside, and saw the boy grab the cane and shout at the man. Another said the boy sat on her window ledge, too. She asked him to stop, but the boy knocked on the window and threatened to break it.

Meanwhile, officers trying to talk to the young men were having a hard time. One youth, 17, was getting mad. An officer tried to detain him, and the encounter turned into a wrestling match. The other boys were telling their friend to back down, but he wouldn’t. Two officers subdued him, cuffed him and stowed him in a patrol car.

That left the other boy, 15, who had been sitting on the window sill. He didn’t say much. Relying on statements from witnesses and the other juveniles, officers arrested him on suspicion of misdemeanor assault, and arrested the 17-year-old on suspicion of obstructing an officer. Both boys were booked into Remann Hall.

Aug. 19: The man was hounding customers at the burger joint and refusing to leave.

Officers drove to the 2200 block of North Pearl Street and found him inside. The man, 25, was a repeater. Officers had removed him from a nearby coffee shop earlier in the day.

Two employees said the man made them nervous. He kept putting his hands down his pants and behaving oddly. He wasn’t buying anything, and he wouldn’t go away.

Officers spoke to the man and told him to go. He said he didn’t have to. Officers told him he would be arrested for trespassing. The man didn’t move.

Officers spoke to the man and told him to go. He said he didn’t have to. Officers told him he would be arrested for trespassing. The man didn’t move.

Officers cuffed him and took him to a patrol car. The man cursed at them. He said he would sue them for everything they had. An officer told him he was banned from the business.

The man said he would go right back and there was nothing police could do about it. The officer said the man would be arrested again if he did that. The man said he didn’t care.

“I’ve been in jail 150 times,” the man said. He was booked into the Pierce County Jail on suspicion of criminal trespassing.

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