Crime

Police beat: Threats from Jesus, a hot-tempered customer, a botched marina eviction

Editors note: Compiled from reports to Tacoma police and the Pierce County Sheriff’s Office.

July 20: The man claimed he was Jesus. His threats to kill people undercut the message.

The dispatch call reported a man with no shirt harassing people at an apartment complex. Two officers drove to the 4200 block of South 30th Street and found a lieutenant on the scene, talking to worried residents. One of the managers told officers that the shirtless man was in one of the units.

Officers knocked on the back door of the apartment and noticed knives on the ground. The shirtless man, 28, stepped out, wrapped in a towel. Officers cuffed him while interviews with witnesses continued.

The manager said the man had been walking around the parking lot of the complex, confronting other residents and claiming to be Jesus.

The manager said the man had been walking around the parking lot of the complex, confronting other residents and claiming to be Jesus. The manager said he tried talking to the man, who threatened to kill the manager and police.

The manager said he tried talking to the man, who threatened to kill the manager and police. The man tried for a head butt and missed as the manager jumped back.

The manager countered with a shot of pepper spray, he said. Another witness backed the manager’s story.

Asked about his actions, the man who claimed to be Jesus said he didn’t threaten anyone or try to head butt anyone. He said he was nice to the people in the parking lot.

Officers noticed the man behaved oddly, perhaps due to drugs; his pupils looked like pinpoints. He talked in tangents, shifting from tears to anger.

Officers booked the man into the Pierce County Jail on suspicion of misdemeanor assault.

July 19: For some reason, the man decided the bathroom of the car audio store was an ideal place to get high.

Officers responding to a report of an unwanted customer drove to the 5000 block of Tacoma Mall Boulevard and spoke to the store manager, who said the man had walked into a neighboring business.

The manager said the man had stopped in a few days earlier, used the store bathroom for 15 minutes and walked out. Employees checked the bathroom later and found a mess, including burnt pieces of aluminum foil on the ground.

Today, the manager said, the man came back, walked directly to the bathroom, closed the door and stayed inside for 20 minutes. He finally came out and asked an employee to use the store’s phone.

Meanwhile, the manager checked the bathroom and found more pieces of burned foil. He stepped out, spoke to the man and asked what he’d been doing in the bathroom.

“Changing my clothes,” the man replied.

The manager checked the bathroom and found more pieces of burned foil. He stepped out, spoke to the man and asked what he’d been doing in the bathroom. “Changing my clothes,” the man replied.

The manager asked again. The man gave the same answer. The manager said it looked more like the man had been drugging in the bathroom.

At that point, the man balled his fist, the manager told officers. Sensing the tension, other employees converged.

The manager told the man the bathroom and the store phone were reserved for paying customers, and the man would have to leave. Employees walked the man out the door.

The man blew up and started running his mouth, the manager said. He threatened to kill the manager and his family.

“You’re dead,” the man said, over and over.

Outside, the man walked toward a car in the store parking lot and kept yelling. The car happened to belong to the manager, who feared the man somehow knew it.

The man walked farther into the parking lot, then abruptly turned and charged back toward the manager, fist in the air, and stopped short.

“That’s right,” the man said, adding slurs for effect. “You better flinch.”

The man knocked over a tent-sale table outside the store doors, scattering merchandise. He walked away, shouting that he would come back with his homies. He stepped into traffic briefly, forcing cars to stop, shouting more threats.

The man knocked over a tent-sale table outside the store doors, scattering merchandise. He walked away, shouting that he would come back with his homies. He stepped into traffic briefly, forcing cars to stop, shouting more threats.

The manager gave a description of the man: 5 feet 9 inches, red hat, red shirt, blue shorts. He pointed toward the neighboring business, a restaurant.

Three officers walked toward the restaurant and saw the man come out. They ordered him to stop and cuffed him.

The man, 26, protested that the people in the car audio store tried to jump him.

Officers asked if the man had any witnesses. The man said two men nearby had seen it. Officers saw no one, and no one stepped forward to back the man’s account.

The man said he was a good guy with a good record, and that his father was a cop. Officers ran a records check and found prior felony convictions for burglary and retail theft.

The man carried a backpack. Inside, officers found clothing with price tags and security tags from multiple outlets at the Tacoma Mall. One officer said it looked like the man had been shoplifting.

“I bought those from a boost,” the man blurted, unwittingly confirming a different crime: possession of stolen property.

Officers also interviewed the manager of the restaurant the man had exited. The manager said the man came into the restaurant, slamming tables and chairs and trying to pick fights with customers.

Officers booked the man into the Pierce County Jail on suspicion of harassment, possession of stolen property and destruction of property.

July 17: Perhaps it wasn’t the best idea to use bikers to enforce a marina eviction.

The dispatch call reported an altercation at the Lakebay Marina and a boat owner who refused to leave. Sheriff’s deputies drove to the site near Lorenz Road KPN. More dispatch calls came in, reporting that the boat was ramming the dock, that people were in the water, and that bikers were involved.

When they arrived, deputies found a woman wrapped in a blanket on the dock, next to her husband, the boat owner.

Interviews with the couple, multiple witnesses and the marina owner soon clarified the confusion. Members of a biker club (the Bandidos) had gathered for an event at the marina.

At some point, the marina owner had tried to evict the couple from their moorage for unpaid rent. Bikers had assisted by unhooking the boat from the dock and shoving it into open water.

At some point, the marina owner had tried to evict the couple from their moorage for unpaid rent. Bikers had assisted by unhooking the boat from the dock and shoving it into open water.

The boat owner, refusing to leave, had steered the craft back toward the dock, sparking a slow-motion push-and-pull battle. As the owner and bikers tried to cut the section of dock away, the owner’s wife scrambled from the boat to the dock and tried to reattach the mooring line.

In the ensuing scuffle with the owner and the bikers, the woman had been knocked into the water, which turned the argument into a clumsy rescue attempt that ended with the woman wrapped in a blanket.

Deputies interviewed the marina owner, who said he had asked previously for assistance with an eviction. The boat owner said he knew the owner wanted him out, and he intended to leave, but he wanted the process handled formally.

Deputies told the marina owner and the boat owner to play by legal rules and get lawyers rather than forcing the issue. No one was arrested.

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