Crime

Police Beat: Fear of the ice cream man, name games, and a rowdy courthouse guest

Editor’s note: Compiled from reports to Tacoma police and the Pierce County Sheriff’s office.

Aug. 14: The ice cream man knocked, but the woman didn’t want his frozen treats, or anything else.

She had called about the man before. Sheriff’s deputies told him to leave her alone. Now he was back.

Deputies drove to a South Hill address. They spoke to the woman, who said the ice cream man had stopped in her driveway, driven around a corner and parked, walked to her house, knocked on her door and peeked in the windows.

The ice cream man had stopped in her driveway, driven around a corner and parked, walked to her house, knocked on her door and peeked in the windows.

The woman had called 911, she said –– but now the ice cream man was gone. She said she was afraid, for herself and her child.

She didn’t know his name, she said. She called him the ice cream man.

Deputies knew the man’s name from prior contacts. They told the woman to file an anti-harassment order. She said she would.

Aug. 17: What’s in a name? Sometimes the answer is history.

The 36-year-old woman sat on a front porch and refused to move. It wasn’t her porch, which was why the resident who lived there wanted her to leave.

The woman wouldn’t go. The resident called police and said a stranger was sitting on her doorstep. Two Tacoma officers drove to an address in the 6600 block of South Cheyenne Street and spoke to the porch-squatter.

Why was she here?

The woman hesitated and said she was meeting her boyfriend.

What was the boyfriend’s name?

The woman didn’t respond.

What was his name?

The woman laughed and said she didn’t have to provide that information.

Was she sure the boyfriend lived at this house?

The woman laughed again and said she was told to meet him here.

One officer asked the resident if any men lived at the house. No, the resident said. And no one invited this strange woman, either.

The other officer asked the woman her name. She said her last name started with a D. What was her full last name?

The woman wouldn’t give it.

The resident piped up that she just wanted the woman to leave.

How about it, the officer asked.

The woman said she didn’t have to leave. She could sit and stand where she wanted. This was a free country. The officer said the woman was sitting on private property. Did she see the fence?

The woman said she didn’t have to leave. She could sit and stand where she wanted. This was a free country.

The officer said the woman was sitting on private property. Did she see the fence?

The woman stepped to an area just beyond the fence, still on the property. The officer told her that wasn’t good enough. She needed to leave.

She wouldn’t. She argued about the street and the sidewalk, and where she could stand.

The resident piped up again. This was why she called, she said; the stranger was frightening her.

Again, the officer told the woman to go.

“You’re going to have to make me leave,” the woman said.

Once more, the officer asked the woman for her last name. Once more, the woman said it started with a D. The officer asked her to spell it. The woman said something, too swift to catch.

The game got old. The officer cuffed the woman and told her she was under arrest for obstruction. The woman said she wanted a lawyer.

The other officer sifted records, trying to find a match. One hit gave a date of birth, a name and a photo. The woman saw it on the patrol car computer screen.

“Well, that is me, but which one of me is that?” she said.

The records showed another name in the system with an identical photo and arrest warrants. Officers booked the woman into the Pierce County Jail.

Aug. 18: The 25-year-old man treated the county courthouse like an airline baggage claim department, and decided the furniture needed rearranging.

The trouble started before 8 a.m., when deputies found the man outside the courthouse doors in downtown Tacoma, throwing his suitcase and backpack at the building. He expected it to be open already, and it wasn’t.

The doors opened, the man entered through the security screens, and tossed his bags to the sides as he went through the metal detector. A deputy warned the man that he needed to behave inside the courthouse. The man said he understood.

At about 9:20 a.m., deputies heard that the man left his luggage unattended in one of the courthouse rooms. Deputies waited 30 minutes, then stowed the gear in the sheriff’s office.

At 10:40, a report said the man had gone into a women’s restroom on the 10th floor. A second report said he’d thrown his coffee on a kiosk outside the district court service windows on the second floor.

At 10:40, a report said the man had gone into a women’s restroom on the 10th floor. A second report said he’d thrown his coffee on a kiosk outside the district court service windows on the second floor.

Deputies hustled to the spot and didn’t see the man. A moment later, he emerged from an elevator, carrying a wooden chair. He carried it to the district court window.

A deputy told the man to stop. The man put down the chair and sat in it. The deputy told the man he was under arrest. The man lifted his hands and flipped two birds.

A struggle followed between the man and three deputies. A wrestling match ended with stun-gun shots. More deputies joined in. The man spat at them. The deputies covered his head with a hood. They booked him into the Pierce County Jail. On Friday, he was charged with third-degree assault.

Sean Robinson: 253-597-8486

  Comments