Outdoors

Speaker will address stormwater pollution in Puget Sound

Laura James from Beneath the Looking Glass will talk about stormwater pollution in Puget Sound Jan. 15. James is appearing in the Discovery Speaker series offered by the South Sound Estuary Association.

An underwater videographer, James will give a presentation on why Puget Sound is in trouble, what makes it a unique marine environment, and what South Sound residents can do to protect and improve it.

Certified to use a rebreather apparatus in 2000, the 42-year-old Seattle resident has made more than 5,000 dives.

In addition to her work as a freelance videographer and environmental journalist, James also works as communications coordinator for Puget Soundkeeper Alliance, and works with Pacific Marine Research’s Marine Science Afloat program, where she teaches school children about Puget Sound marine ecology. She opened Adventure Diving Inc., the first technical diving facility in Washington, with business partner Steve Pearson.

During her presentation, James will discuss and show images of how stormwater pollution affectsthe Puget Sound marine environment. In 2011, James shot video of black stormwater runoff billowing out of a West Seattle storm drain that emptied into Elliott Bay.

The Discovery Speaker series began in September and will run through March. The remaining programs on the series schedule are:

Feb. 19: Chris Page from the Ruckelshaus Center will talk about the results of the center’s Capital Lake assessment.

March 19: Joe Evenson of the state Department of Fish and Wildlife will talk about shorebirds of Puget Sound.

The series is free and open to the public, thanks in part to The Russell Family Foundation, the Washington Foundation for the Environment, donations from presenters and members/supporters of the association.

The program will be held at LOTT’s WET Science Center, 500 Adams St. NE, Olympia. The doors open at 6:30 p.m., with the program running from 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m.

For more information, send an email to center@sseacenter.org.

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