Outdoors

High Rock lookout restoration boosted by grant

The White Pass Country Historical Society in Packwood has received a $2,000 grant through the Valerie Sivinski Washington Preserves Fund and the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation.

The funding will be used to restore the exterior of the 1929 High Rock Fire Lookout in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The work also will include restoration and rehabilitation of the catwalks, siding and windows.

The structure sits at the 5,685-foot summit of High Rock, giving observers views of the southern flank of Mount Rainier and vistas that include Mount St. Helens and Mount Adams.

Other Sivinski grant recipients include:

• The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, $1,000, to design and fabricate new exhibits for the Catherine Montgomery Interpretive Center at Federation Forest State Park near Greenwater. The work is part of the major renovation of the building.



• The Gig Harbor BoatShop, $1,000 to restore the historic launch “Ellyn.” Built in 1940-41, the boat will be used in the shop’s fleet.



• The Points Northeast Historical Society, $1,000 to restore the oil house at Browns Point Lighthouse Park.



The grants honor Valerie Sivinski, a preservationist who was killed in October 2000 while performing preservation-related work. She was a longtime board member of the Washington Trust and served as president in the early 1990s. The fund offers small grants up to $2,000 for historic preservation projects at the community level. Since 1998, the fund has awarded nearly $110,000 in grants to more than 115 projects.

A grant last year from the Sivinski fund was used by University Place to restore than exterior paint on the Curran House, which is on the National Register of Historic Places. The Spanaway Historical Society also received a grant in 2014 to reroof the milk shed and blacksmith shed at the Prairie House Museum.

FREE ENTRANCE TO PARKS

To commemorate Martin Luther King Jr. Day, entrance to all national parks will be free on Monday. That includes Mount Rainier and Olympic national parks that ordinarily charge $15 for seven-day vehicle entrance passes.

Monday will be one of nine days this year whenvisitors will not have to pay to visit a national park.

The other fee-free days will be: Feb. 14-16 for Presidents Day weekend, April 18-19 for the opening weekend of National Park week, Aug. 25 to celebrate the National Park Service’s 99th birthday, Sept. 26 for National Public Lands Day and Nov. 11 for Veterans Day.

The U.S. Forest Service will also waive entrance fees on Monday. Other fee-free days for the Forest Service this year are Feb. 16, June 13 (National Get Outdoors Day), Sept. 26 and Nov. 11.

Washington State Parks also will have free admission for Martin Luther King Jr. Day, waiving the need for a Discover Pass Sunday (Jan. 18) and Monday.

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