Seattle Mariners

Former Mariners, Seahawks, Sonics and Cougars stars headline 2018 state Hall of Fame class

Mariners honor Ken Griffey Jr., immortalize his No. 24

Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, Rickey Henderson, Kobe Bryant and Jeff Gordon were just some of the people who helped the Mariners pay tribute to recent National Baseball Hall of Fame inductee Ken Griffey Jr. on Saturday at Safeco Field. Griffey's No. 24
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Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, Rickey Henderson, Kobe Bryant and Jeff Gordon were just some of the people who helped the Mariners pay tribute to recent National Baseball Hall of Fame inductee Ken Griffey Jr. on Saturday at Safeco Field. Griffey's No. 24

Ken Griffey Jr., George Karl, Rueben Mayes and Mike Price will headline the State of Washington Hall of Fame's Class of 2018.

“It’s a memorable class with Griffey as an obvious ‘lock,’ but also honors seven other deserving people," said Hall of Fame Director Marc Blau.

The class also includes Kentucky Derby-winning jockey Alfred Johnson of Spokane, Olympic heptathlete Kelly Blair LaBounty of Prosser, Tacoma fastpitch pitcher Louise Mazzuca and former Seattle baseball team owner Dan Dugdale.

Plaques depicting each inductee are displayed at the Shanaman Sports Museum in the Tacoma Dome.

A closer look at the Class of 2018:

Ken Griffey Jr, Seattle Mariners: The baseball star played 22 seasons with the Mariners, Cincinnati Reds and Chicago White Sox and was a 13-time all-star. His 630 homers are sixth most in Major League history. He was inducted into the baseball hall of fame in 2016.

Mike Price, WSU football: The University of Puget Sound graduate and Everett native, coached Washington State to the 1997 and 2002 Rose Bowls. He was 83-76 in 14 seasons with the Cougars. He won several national Coach of the Year awards in '97 and was the Pac-10 Coach of the Year in 1997 and 2001.

Rueben Mayes, WSU football: Mayes was an All-American running back for the Cougars and set an NCAA record with 357 rushing yards against Oregon in 1984. He was the NFL offensive rookie of the year in 1986 when he played for the New Orleans Saints. In seven NFL season (including two with the Seahawks), Mayes was a two-time Pro Bowl selection. He holds records for most bowl seasons at WSU (five) and UTEP (three, tied with Mike Brumbelow).

George Karl, Seattle Sonics: In his seven seasons coaching the Sonics, the team made the playoff each season. He coached the Sonics to the 1996 NBA Finals, where they lost to Chicago. He was 384-150 with the Sonics and launched the Friends of Hoop high school program. He was 1,999-1,175 as an NBA coach and played five seasons with the San Antonio Spurs (three in the ABA and two in the NBA).

Alfred Johnson, jockey: Johnson grew up near Spokane and rode winners at 1922 and '26 Kentucky Derby and 1925-26 Belmont Stakes. The U.S. Racing Hall of Fame member also worked as a trainer for singer and actor Bing Crosby.

Kelly Blair LaBounty, Olympic heptathlete: The Prosser High graduate won two NCAA heptathlon titles for the University of Oregon and finished eighth at the '96 games. LaBounty, wife of former Seahawks defensive end Matt LaBounty, made the 2000 Olympic team but injuries kept her from competing.

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Stadium High graduate and fastpitch softball Hall of Famer Louise Mazzuca died March 27, two weeks after learning she was voted into the State of Washington Sports Hall of Fame. She was 79.
Louise Mazzuca, Tacoma fastpitch pitcher:

The Stadium High graduate pitched 35 no-hitters (including 9 perfect games), made five All-America teams and set a World Tournament record in 1961 with three no-hitters. In 1964, she pitched 7- and 29-inning complete game on the same night. In 2007, she became just the second woman from Washington to be inducted into the American Softball Association Hall of Fame. She died March 27, just two weeks after learning she was inducted into the state hall of fame.

Dan Dugdale, Seattle baseball team owner: Dugdale, sometimes called Washington's “father of professional baseball,” played 50 games in the Major Leagues. He is best known for organizing the Pacific Northwest League and owning several Seattle-area professional teams. He died in 1934.

The state Hall of Fame is voted on by current and former sportswriters (including four from The News Tribune), broadcasters and historians from around the state.

Induction ceremonies have not been scheduled but are planned for upcoming Seattle Mariners and WSU football games.

Craig Hill: 253-597-8497





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