Seattle Mariners

Baseball Hall of Fame history, by the numbers

These old-time ball stars were pictured as they attended the dedication of the National Baseball Hall of Fame on Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, on June 12, 1939. Front row, left to right: Eddie Collins, Babe Ruth, Connie Mack, Cy Young; Rear row, left to right: Honus Wagner, Grover Cleveland Alexander, Tris Speaker, Nap Lajoie, George Sisler and Walter Johnson.
These old-time ball stars were pictured as they attended the dedication of the National Baseball Hall of Fame on Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, on June 12, 1939. Front row, left to right: Eddie Collins, Babe Ruth, Connie Mack, Cy Young; Rear row, left to right: Honus Wagner, Grover Cleveland Alexander, Tris Speaker, Nap Lajoie, George Sisler and Walter Johnson. The Associated Press

Randy Johnson’s induction last season into the National Baseball Hall of Fame certainly drew interest from Seattle Mariners fans, but Johnson’s plaque, ultimately, featured an Arizona Diamondbacks cap.

So the induction of Ken Griffey Jr. on July 24 will register as a historic moment for baseball fans in the Pacific Northwest. Griffey won’t be the first Hall of Famer to have played for the Mariners, but he will be the first to have a Mariners cap and logo on his Hall of Fame plaque, and the first to have achieved the bulk of his career accomplishments in Seattle.

With that in mind, here is a by-the-numbers look at some more Hall history, for those who might not have had reason to be familiar with baseball’s most hallowed ground prior to Griffey’s election into this exclusive club.

1 — Number of Hall of Famers who played the majority of their games as a designated hitter. Frank Thomas, elected in 2014, is the only one. He was a DH in 1,308 of his 2,277 career starts, while he played first base in 969 games. Mariners fans hope that Edgar Martinez, who garnered 43.4 percent of the vote in 2016, might eventually make it, too.

 
Spokane’s favorite son, Ryne Sandberg. AP file

3 — Number of Hall of Famers born in Washington state — second baseman Ryne Sandberg (Spokane), third baseman Ron Santo (Seattle) and center fielder Earl Averill (Snohomish). No Hall of Famers were born in Oregon. Just one, Twins slugger Harmon Killebrew, was born in Idaho (Payette).

4 — Number of players currently in the Hall of Fame who played at some point for the Mariners — pitcher Randy Johnson (1989-98), pitcher Rich “Goose” Gossage (1994), outfielder Rickey Henderson (2000) and pitcher Gaylord Perry (1982-83). Two other Hall of Famers have Mariners ties — Dick Williams, who was inducted by the veterans committee in 2008 and managed the Mariners from 1986-88; and Pat Gillick, the Mariners’ general manager from 2000-03. Gillick, the architect of Seattle’s 116-win team in 2001, was elected to the Hall by the Expansion Era Committee (a modern branch of what is commonly known as the Veterans Committee) and inducted in 2011.

5 — Number of players inducted in the Hall’s first class in 1936 — outfielder Ty Cobb, pitchers Walter Johnson and Christy Mathewson, outfielder Babe Ruth and shortstop Honus Wagner.

10 — Number of umpires in the Hall of Fame. Also, the maximum number of players whom the Baseball Writers’ Association of America (BBWAA) voters may include on their ballots in a single year.

17 — Number of players from the Negro Leagues inducted into the Hall in 2006 by the Special Committee on Negro Leagues.

 
Babe Ruth, right, points to his locker in Yankee Stadium, June 13, 1948, as he stands with Mark Koenig, center, and Bob Meusel. The locker was sent to the hall of fame. AP file

26 — Number of Hall of Fame players, executives and managers whose primary team was the New York Yankees. That’s more than any other team. The New York Giants have the second-most members with 20.

35 — Number of Negro League players and executives in the Hall of Fame.

51 — Number of players elected to the Hall of Fame in their first year on the ballot. Griffey is one of them.

69 — Number of Hall of Famers who are currently living.

75.0 — Percent of the vote needed to be elected into the Hall of Fame by the BBWAA.

77 — Number of pitchers in the Hall of Fame, more than any other position.

99.32 — Percent of voters who included Griffey on their 2016 ballots, which set a record. His name appeared on 437 of 440 total ballots. Pitcher Tom Seaver previously held the record with 98.84 percent of the vote in 1992.

121 — Number of Hall of Famers elected by the BBWAA, which casts votes for former major league players only.

134 — Number of Hall of Fame players who have won the World Series.

165 — Number of Hall of Famers elected by various veterans committees, which were formerly known as the Committee to Consider Managers, Umpires, Executives and Long-Retired Players.

312 — Total number of Hall of Famers — players, executives, managers and umpires — including Griffey and Mike Piazza, the only 2016 inductees.

Source: National Baseball Hall of Fame

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