Seattle Seahawks

Richard Sherman tells local media he’s done talking to them, those who tick him off

Seahawks star cornerback Richard Sherman said Wednesday, four days before Seattle’s playoff opener at home against Detroit, that he’s done talking to the local media.
Seahawks star cornerback Richard Sherman said Wednesday, four days before Seattle’s playoff opener at home against Detroit, that he’s done talking to the local media. AP

Richard Sherman is done with the local media.

The Seahawks’ All-Pro cornerback refused to be interviewed while sitting at his locker moments before Wednesday’s practice for Saturday’s wild-card playoff game against Detroit at CenturyLink Field. He said he doesn’t want to talk to people who have recently ticked him off.

He said the only reporter he will talk to is ESPN’s national football man Ed Werder.

He also reiterated from last week that we will miss him when he’s gone -- more specifically the opportunity to get quotes from him is gone.

Sherman had a December full of drama.

First, his sideline screaming at coach Pete Carroll and offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell during the win over Los Angeles on Dec. 15, because the Seahawks were passing from the 1-yard line.

Then he had meetings with Carroll, and a team meeting the following Wednesday before the Christmas Eve loss to Arizona. That week also included Sherman getting upset during his weekly press conference at Seattle radio host Jim Moore for questioning why he, as a defensive player, felt he had the right to question offensive play calling. Sherman threatened while walking out of the interview session to have Moore’s credential to cover the team revoked and said “I’ll ruin your career.”

That week ended with Carroll saying he was surprised Sherman hadn’t apologized more clearly and directly.

Last week, Sherman declared he wasn’t doing his weekly press conferences any more. He called it a “privilege” he had been providing to the media, and that we would all miss him when he’s gone.

When I asked him last week at his locker if he got punished by coaches or by the team for his sideline yelling or for challenging a reporter, Sherman asked back: “Did you see me get punished?

“Did you ask the coach?

“What did he say?”

Carroll said last month whatever punishment he may or may not have felt was warranted for Sherman would have already occurred and would remain an internal matter.

When I told Sherman that last week, he replied: “So … cool. Cool.”

Earlier Thursday, before Sherman talked briefly at his locker, a reporter in a press conference began a question to Doug Baldwin, Sherman’s Stanford teammate, with: “Doug, you’ve been around Richard Sherman for a long time...”

“Too long,” Baldwin interjected jokingly and in a dead-pan tone.

The question was where Sherman’s head was at entering the playoffs, after a month of distractions.

“Sherm’s always focused, you know,” Baldwin said. “Despite whatever distractions might be going on around him that he himself might have created, he always seems to find a way to center himself and focus back on the task at hand.

“So he’s done an excellent job in the locker room. To his credit, he’s done really well. I expect nothing less from him in the game. He’s going to play really well, because that’s just who he is.”

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