Seattle Seahawks

He is no fish out of water when it comes to rushing NFL quarterbacks

Seahawks defensive lineman David Bass (47) sacks Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes in the third quarter. The Seattle Seahawks played the Kansas City Chiefs in a preseason game at CenturyLink Field in Seattle, Wash., on Friday, August 25, 2017.
Seahawks defensive lineman David Bass (47) sacks Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes in the third quarter. The Seattle Seahawks played the Kansas City Chiefs in a preseason game at CenturyLink Field in Seattle, Wash., on Friday, August 25, 2017. jbessex@gateline.com

Known for his keen instinct, and mad-dog motor, David Bass knows what he’s best-suited to do after his NFL playing days are over.

He wants to be a police detective.

But right now, he is the one who is leaving the clues for the Seattle Seahawks to figure out why he belongs on the 53-man roster.

For a third consecutive preseason game Friday, the fifth-year professional out of Missouri Western State made impact plays with the second-string defense, registering two tackles for loss, including a sack, in Seatte’s 26-13 victory over Kansas City at CenturyLink Field.

And it’s those type of splash plays that coaches not only remember, but they see again and again when they review it on film.

“That is my goal,” said the sprightly Bass at his locker after the game. “I signed a one-year deal (in May). And with the defensive line they have, you’ve got to put your best foot forward every chance you step on the field if you want to have a chance to make it here.”

This isn’t your ordinary free agent trying to hang on in the NFL. At 26, he is still in the prime of his career.

But Tennessee released him after last season after he played in 29 of the team’s 32 games since 2015, racking up 52 tackles.

Bass said he never really fit in with the Titans’ 3-4 defensive scheme where he mostly played at outside linebacker.

“I always told myself it didn’t matter. I always said if I was an outside linebacker, I’d have more opportunities, whether it was getting a sack or dropping in coverage and catching a pick,” Bass said. “But everybody around me tells me, ‘My roots are in the 4-3 (defense), go back to the 4-3.’ So I managed to come to a 4-3. It is like second nature.”

And he has shown why.

In the first preseason game at San Diego, Bass was an edge-rushing terror, consistently getting to backup quarterback Kellen Clemens.

In fact, on both of Clemens’ interceptions, it was Bass who got the hit on the passer.

Last week at home against Minnesota, Bass lined up all over the defensive line, getting pressure on the quarterback from all angles. He also recovered a fumble caused by rookie Chris Carson on the kickoff coverage team.

“He has a good body where he can go inside and outside,” Seahawks’ linebacker K.J. Wright said. “He reminds me of Frank (Clark) a little bit in that way.”

Then came his first sack Friday night on Kansas City’s first series of the second half.

On third down, Bass got push up the middle, but got caught inside after teammate Marcus Smith flushed Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes to the outside.

In a dead sprint to a spot along the right sideline, Bass just happened to meet the scrambling Mahomes head-on for an easy sack.

“I will take those,.” Bass said. “Makes it easy for me.”

It was an especially cool moment for Bass, too, because the play happened in the same southwest corner of the stadium where his mother; his wife, Jahnene, and his newborn daughter, Mariyah, were sitting.

It was 2-month-old Mariyah’s first game, too.

“She had her headphones on and everything,” Bass said. “She probably was asleep.”

With the uncertain future of second-round rookie Malik McDowell along the defensive line, that could be the opening Bass needs to make this squad this season.

“Bass is good, man,” Wright said. “Don’t sleep on him.”

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