Seattle Seahawks

Size matters: Carroll wants big receivers, Seahawks agree on deal with Brandon Marshall

This is the photograph 34-year-old Brandon Marshall posted on his Instagram account online Tuesday after the veteran wide receiver agreed to a one-year contract with the Seahawks. The deal for the former New York Giants, Jets, Chicago Bears, Miami Dolphins and Denver Broncos pass catcher is reportedly worth up to $2 million, including incentives.
This is the photograph 34-year-old Brandon Marshall posted on his Instagram account online Tuesday after the veteran wide receiver agreed to a one-year contract with the Seahawks. The deal for the former New York Giants, Jets, Chicago Bears, Miami Dolphins and Denver Broncos pass catcher is reportedly worth up to $2 million, including incentives.

Pete Carroll always wants more big wide receivers.

The Seahawks' newest one for their coach: six-time Pro Bowl pass catcher Brandon Marshall.

The 34-year-old veteran indicated on his social-media Instagram account online Tuesday he's signing a free-agent contract with Seattle.

Let’s Go.

A post shared by Brandon Marshall (@bmarshall) on

The one-year deal could be worth up to $2 million, including incentives, according to ESPN's Adam Schefter.

Marshall was an All-Pro in 2012 for catching 118 passes for 1,508 yards for the Bears. He had 109 receptions with a league-leading 14 touchdowns in 2015 with the New York Jets, then 59 for them in 2016 before he played only a month last season before getting injured with the Giants.

He arrives six weeks after the Giants waived him with a failed-physical designation.

"We would always like to have (big wide receivers)," Carroll said this month. "Our guys that do a lot of our playing are the quicker guys, smaller guys ... so we are always looking."

Marshall has had six seasons with more than 100 receptions in his 12-year career for Denver, Miami, Chicago, the Jets and the Giants. He played just five games for the Giants and had a career-low 18 receptions with them. His 2017 season ended on Oct. 10 when New York put him on injured reserve with a severe ankle injury.

The Seahawks were believed to be the only team interested in signing Marshall after the Giants gave up on him April 19.

Here's why: He's 6 feet 4 and 229 pounds. So if he proves to be healthy again, back from the ankle issues, he could give the Seahawks what they need, especially after the offseason departure of 6-foot-7 Jimmy Graham and his 10 touchdown catches last year to Green Bay in free agency.

In the last eight months Seattle has also lost former No.-2 wide receiver Jermaine Kearse in a trade to the Jets for since-departed defensive tackle Sheldon Richardson, plus Kearse's successor as the second wide out, Paul Richardson, to Washington in free agency this spring.

Carroll has for decades coveted big, physical wide receivers. Before Marshall's deal Tuesday, one the first practice day of Seattle's second week of organized team activities, the Seahawks' proven wide receivers were 5-10, 192-pound Doug Baldwin, with 5-10, 182-pound Tyler Lockett entering the final year of his rookie contract and Marcus Johnson (6-1, 204) plus Jaron Brown (6-3, 204) having arrived this offseason to compete for playing time. Last year's draft picks Amara Darboh (6-2, 215) and David Moore (6-0, 215) remain unknowns entering their second NFL seasons.

The only one of the now-12 wide receivers Seattle has on its 90-man offseason roster bigger than Marshall is Tanner McEvoy (6-6, 230). But the former college quarterback and safety, a surprise to make the team as a rookie free agent in 2016, is no sure thing to make the 2018 team.

Size is the reason the Seahawks signed former University of Washington and Mississippi transfer wide receiver Damore'ea Stringfellow this month out of a tryout at rookie minicamp. He's 6-2 and 209, but has yet to play in an NFL game.

Marshall has played in 172 of them in the regular season.

Marshall has made news off the field in his career. He wrote last year's for The Players' Tribune that he was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD) in 2011.

In 2016, ESPN reported Marshall and Sheldon Richardson, then two of the Jets' biggest stars, had a loud "verbal altercation" in New York's locker room following a game.

Carroll has rarely shied away from signing talent, size, speed and athleticism, even when those skills come in a loud package.

If Marshall proves healthy, the Seahawks potentially have filled a need. If not, they are investing in him for only a short-term, low-risk tryout.

Seattle Seahawks coach Pete Carroll talks about the start of organized team activities, what’s different for Russell Wilson with new offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer.

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