Seahawks Insider Blog

Half of Trevone Boykin’s Texas legal troubles close with ‘no finding of guilt’

Seahawks backup quarterback Trevone Boykin’s case in Bexar County, Texas, closed with him avoiding jail time and any finding of guilt. He had been facing the possibility of revocation of his probation there. Boykin still has a court hearing in Dallas rescheduled for Aug. 22, in his second case from this offseason.
Seahawks backup quarterback Trevone Boykin’s case in Bexar County, Texas, closed with him avoiding jail time and any finding of guilt. He had been facing the possibility of revocation of his probation there. Boykin still has a court hearing in Dallas rescheduled for Aug. 22, in his second case from this offseason. phaley@thenewstribune.com

Trevone Boykin is halfway to closing his offseason legal issues in Texas.

What that may or may not mean to the NFL remains unclear.

A clerk with the Bexar County Court that had been hearing the Seahawks quarterback’s case for possibly revoking his probation there, and Boykin’s San Antonio-based attorney, both told me Wednesday Boykin’s case there is closed.

“There is no finding of guilt,” Boykin’s attorney in San Antonio, Jaime Cavazos, said in a phone conversation.

“He is done with us,” the coordinator for Bexar County Court 12 confirmed.

Court records show it closed July 7, after he had pleaded no contest. Boykin was fined $1,500 and ordered to pay another $237 in court costs.

Boykin got probation in Bexar County as a result of pleading no contest in June 2016 to a misdemeanor charge of resisting arrest following an incident at a bar Dec. 31, 2015. He was in San Antonio then to play in the Alamo Bowl for Texas Christian University. He was fined $1,500 in disposition of that case, required to take anger-management and alcohol-awareness courses and – according to Cavazos – required to check in regularly in writing and with phone calls to his probation officer.

That requirement continued while Boykin was in Seattle last year playing his rookie season as Russell Wilson’s backup and an undrafted free agent for the Seahawks.

Then in March, Boykin was arrested and briefly jailed on charges of marijuana possession and public intoxication relating to a car crash in which he was a passenger. He was facing revocation of his probation in San Antonio and possibly up to a year in jail time because of that incident.

His case in Dallas, part two of his legal troubles in his home state, has been pushed into August.

Records from Dallas County Court show a hearing for Boykin’s case there was to be last week but is now scheduled for Aug. 22. That is between the Seahawks’ second exhibition game, home against Minnesota, and the third preseason game against Kansas City.

I asked coach Pete Carroll last month if the Seahawks had any information from the NFL on whether the league might punish Boykin for his offseason troubles per its personal-conduct policy.

“I don’t have any other information than what we’ve had,” Carroll said June 15. “So I know nothing more. We have to wait and see what that’s all about.”

Boykin was arrested and briefly jailed March 27 in Dallas. He was a passenger in a car that backed across a curb and through the front of a bar, injuring eight. Boykin was booked into jail for about a day before posting $500 bond after charges of possessing less than two ounces of marijuana and investigation of public intoxication, according to jail records.

At the time of his arrest in Dallas, the Seahawks issued a statement that they were “disappointed.” Three months later, as expected, they signed a veteran to compete with Boykin as Wilson’s backup in 2017. Austin Davis, a journeyman and former part-time starter for the Cleveland Browns and the St. Louis Rams, participated in Seattle’s organized team activities and veteran minicamp in June. Davis will be on the field July 30 for the start of training camp, along with Wilson and Boykin, of course.

“Austin did really well. Amazingly bright football player,” Carroll said last month at the end of the Seahawks’ minicamp. “He blew us away with how fast he can pick stuff up. He brings more play-time experience, just in the meeting room, that we treasure. He’s been there. He’s played games and all that. Trevone’s hasn’t had that, can’t have that yet. It’s been a good mix so far.

“We brought him in and we’ll make evaluations as we get back. But I think Austin showed very well for himself. He showed his own style, different than Trevone or Russell, of course. But I kind of like what he brought us.”

The official disposition of Boykin’s case in San Antonio is “deferred adjudication termination unsatisfactory.”

Cavazos said prosecutors “didn’t present witnesses to prove” in Bexar County Court that his client’s arrest in Dallas violated terms of his one-year probation in San Antonio. What the judge found, Cavazos said, was that Boykin “did not complete his probation 100 percent satisfactorily” because of administrative and paperwork issues regarding the monthly check-ins with his probation officer.

Boykin’s lawyer said the quarterback’s probation officer quit and moved without Boykin knowing it. Cavazos said it took “months” for a new person to be found to replace the departed probation officer, and thus the forms Boykin was sending and check-in voicemails Boykin was leaving were going to no one.

“The judge found that he did not send the forms on time,” Cavazos said, “that he should have used more due diligence, such as contacting me so I could go knocking on doors here...

“As far as in Bexar County (with violating probation), there was no finding of guilt.”

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