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‘Bus Doggy Dog’ is the ultimate ruff-rider

Bus-riding dog is tha shiznit

Eclipse stars in a music video from the King County DOT. The black Labrador retriever mix is a regular on a bus route through Seattle’s Queen Anne neighborhood. She also rides solo several times a week to a nearby dog park where she meets her owner.
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Eclipse stars in a music video from the King County DOT. The black Labrador retriever mix is a regular on a bus route through Seattle’s Queen Anne neighborhood. She also rides solo several times a week to a nearby dog park where she meets her owner.

The dog has starred in a rap video, but her bus pass is what made her famous.

Eclipse is a black Labrador retriever mix and a regular on the D-Line through Seattle’s Queen Anne neighborhood.

She rides solo several times a week to a nearby dog park, her bus pass attached to her harness. Eclipse prefers the front seat and always watches out the window.

“All the bus drivers know her. She sits here just like a person does,” fellow rider Tiona Rainwater told KOMO. “She makes everybody happy. How could you not love this face?”

It all started years back when Eclipse and owner Jeff Young were waiting for their bus. Young hadn’t finished his cigarette and wasn’t ready to board.

The dog was.

Eclipse recognized their stop and got off at the dog park, patiently waiting for Young to catch up 10 minutes later on the next bus.

Since then, it’s become tradition.

“A lot of people consider her the unofficial mascot of Seattle,” Lauren Campbell told TODAY.com. “She’s like a four-legged ambassador.”

King County Department of Transportation apparently agreed.

They made a short video in 2015 featuring their most famous rider to the tune of “Bus Doggy Dog.”

It shows Eclipse getting pats, lying in the laps of strangers and posing for selfies.

Transportation officials said they prefer dogs to be on leashes, but they can ride buses at the discretion of the drivers as long as they aren’t creating a major disturbance.

“She’s been here the last two years, so she’s been urbanized totally,” Young told KOMO.

People are almost disappointed if they see him riding without Eclipse.

“People on the bus now, they look for her,” he said. “She really makes their day. If I show up without her, people are like, ‘Hi. Where’s Eclipse?’”

The dog has become even more recognizable with her own Facebook page, showing snapshots of her many rides. More than 5,350 people like the page.

Stacia Glenn: 253-597-8653

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