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Kidstown’s financial report

Chuck Valley, vice president for Romanian operations with the Bellingham-based Kidstown International, shows photos to two residents at the Casa Otneil home for abandoned children outside Timisoara, Romania on Sept. 28, 2015.
Chuck Valley, vice president for Romanian operations with the Bellingham-based Kidstown International, shows photos to two residents at the Casa Otneil home for abandoned children outside Timisoara, Romania on Sept. 28, 2015. Staff writer

Kidstown International has become a million-dollar charity.

Its revenues in 2014 were more than $1 million, up from about $835,000 in 2013, according to the oversight group Evangelical Council for Financial Responsibility.

The council recognizes Kidstown as an accredited organization with 501(c)(3) nonprofit status.

Total administrative costs were about $81,600 in 2014, up from about $78,500 the year before. Fundraising costs topped $100,000 each year.

Charity Navigator, a charity watchdog group, does not list Kidstown because of its small financial footprint.

“What we’re doing is just a grain of sand,” said Kidstown’s executive director, Matthew Smith, a 15-year veteran.

He said 92 percent of the group’s funding comes through sponsorships — 70 percent from Washington state residents and the remainder primarily from the Midwest. Sponsorships are $456 a year, or $38 a month, per child.

The group has hired seven regional administrators, two each in Romania and Nepal, and three in India.

“We’re strictly a partner organization,” Smith said. “We provide funding and one-time needs. We don’t get involved in governance.”

The group does conduct inspections of of the orphanages, and each provides a monthly financial statement.

C.R. Roberts, staff writer

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