Gateway: News

Artondale Farms purchases Gig Harbor Grange to keep local history alive

Scott and Jess Hogan, owners of Artondale Farm, stand for a portrait with their daughter, Loren, outside of the Gig Harbor Grange building on Friday. The Hogans recently purchased the building and plan on renovating it and using it for farm-related activities.
Scott and Jess Hogan, owners of Artondale Farm, stand for a portrait with their daughter, Loren, outside of the Gig Harbor Grange building on Friday. The Hogans recently purchased the building and plan on renovating it and using it for farm-related activities. jbessex@gateline.com

When Jess and Scott Hogan heard the neighboring Gig Harbor Grange hall was for sale, the couple moved quickly to secure a piece of Gig Harbor’s history.

The Hogans are the owners of Artondale Farm, and had been looking to purchase the building at 5925 Artondale Dr. NW for several years.

“We’ve been wanting to purchase it for years and years and years,” Jess Hogan said. “We hated the idea that someone might come in and tear it down to put in a gas station or something.”

The couple has received positive support and encouragement in regards to the purchase of the building, from customers and the Gig Harbor community since announcing the purchase on their Facebook page.

We’ve been wanting to purchase it for years and years and years. We hated the idea that someone might come in and tear it down to put in a gas station or something.

Jess Hogan, owner of Artondale Farm

They’re still working on a formal plan for the building, but their goal is to restore the structure and use the upstairs space for classes and install a commercial kitchen in the basement, she said.

“We want to restore it back to 1912, when it was built,” Hogan said. “We figure there’s at least a year’s worth of heavy work.”

Hogan did not disclose the purchase amount of the Gig Harbor Grange hall.

The couple has already started work on the building, beginning with blocking off the parking lot and moving years of dirt buildup away from the structure’s foundation to try and combat the water damage done to the building’s basement.

We want to restore it back to 1912, when it was built. We figure there’s at least a years worth of heavy work.

Hogan

“The basement’s been wet for decades — a lot of water damage,” Hogan said.

Along with removing the damage to the building, the couple will be removing the 1960s-era remodeling installed over the years to reveal the original 1912 structure.

“Right now we’re peeling off the stuff that’s covering the old stuff,” Hogan said. “We’re working to restore the building to historical accuracy, while keeping modern convenience.”

Right now we’re peeling off the stuff that’s covering the old stuff. We’re working to restore the building to historical accuracy, while keeping modern convenience.

Hogan

Restoring historical buildings is nothing new to the couple, who restored their previous home, a 1923 bungalow in Portland.

“It’s an old hat,” Hogan said, adding that Scott is a former architect with training in restoring historic buildings.

In addition to the space the building provides, the couple has moved their farm stand to the Gig Harbor Grange parking lot, opening for customers from 1 to 6 p.m. Thursday through Saturday until the farm produce is gone.

“We’ll be out here a lot this winter with the tractor,” Hogan said.

Andrea Haffly: 253-358-4155, @gateway_andrea

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