Puyallup Herald

Puyallup seeks public input on downtown design for new development

Puyallup aims to maintain historic feel of downtown

The city of Puyallup plans to update its downtown design guidelines for the first time since 2006. The public can speak their minds at an Open House from 5-6:30 p.m. on April 18 at Puyallup City Hall.
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The city of Puyallup plans to update its downtown design guidelines for the first time since 2006. The public can speak their minds at an Open House from 5-6:30 p.m. on April 18 at Puyallup City Hall.

From businesses to housing, Puyallup is anticipating new development downtown.

The city wants to make sure those new projects fit with its vision.

For the first time since they were adopted in 2006, the city is making changes to its Downtown Design Guidelines, and it’s seeking public input.

“Downtown Puyallup is a pedestrian friendly environment that reflects Puyallup’s unique personality of culture, history and identity in its building design, mix of uses, and public spaces, amenities and public art,” according to the draft document.

The city wants developers to keep in mind how pedestrians navigate the space around their buildings, said Kendall Wals, associate city planner.

The guidelines emphasize a “pedestrian experience” by embellishing blank walls with public art, murals, greenery or other adornments.

The guidelines also encourage historic styles to match the “existing character of Puyallup’s older building forms” through the use of flat roofs and cornices.

The new document outlines specific areas where the guidelines would apply — mostly downtown and on parts of South Hill.

The document also provides a map of buildings in the city that are on the local and state historic register for developers to reference, such as Meeker Mansion.

“It provides a boundary and a visual,” Wals said about the plan.

The updated document reorganizes projects by its design rather than type.

It also encourages the use of “high-quality materials” like glass, brick, glass, cement and stone masonry.

The guidelines encourage locating vehicle garage entries “away from the primary street and keeping it pedestrian friendly along that frontage area,” Wals said.

City Council considered a downtown development plan in December that would replace parking lots at 2nd Street Southeast with a three-level retail and office space and 114 one-bedroom units.

The public is welcome to share thoughts on the new design guidelines online at cityofpuyallup.org or at an open house from 5 to 6:30 p.m. on Thursday (April 18) at Puyallup City Hall, 333 S. Meridian.

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