Puyallup Herald

There’s new artwork in downtown Puyallup. Can you spot them all?

New art installed around Puyallup’s Pioneer Park. What’s your favorite?

Five new pieces of art were installed around downtown Puyallup’s Pioneer Park Sunday as part of Arts Downtown rotating art gallery. Each sculputure and statue brings a message to the community, according to the artists.
Up Next
Five new pieces of art were installed around downtown Puyallup’s Pioneer Park Sunday as part of Arts Downtown rotating art gallery. Each sculputure and statue brings a message to the community, according to the artists.

New pieces of art were installed around Pioneer Park in Puyallup on Sunday.

It was the work of Arts Downtown, a nonprofit, all-volunteer organization that curates a rotating art gallery in Puyallup.

Every two years, the group selects new pieces of art to share with the community.

“This year we have worked to consolidate the sculptures more in the downtown area so that visitors to our city can visit them in an easy manner,” Arts Downtown president Becky Condra said.

The goal of Arts Downtown is to enhance visual literacy and appreciation for the arts and encourage cultural tourism, according to its website.

This year, five new pieces were installed. A sixth sculpture, called “Pony Play” by Cordelia Blackburn, will be offered as a donation to the city as part of its permanent collection.

Currently, there are more than 50 pieces of art in the organization’s rotating gallery.

The new artwork was made by artists all over the state, from Vancouver to Bellingham.

“Camp Harmony”

DSC_1025.jpeg
Camp Harmony by artist John Zylstra was installed on Meridian across from Pioneer Park on Sunday, April 28. Gary McCutcheon Courtesy

“Camp Harmony” is a reminder of Puyallup’s history.

The 10-foot tall steel sculpture was created by Bellingham artist John Zylstra and references Japanese shoji screens and barbed wire.

“I believe that most long-term Puyallup residents will know that ‘Camp Harmony’ was a Japanese internment camp during World War II and in operation nearby,” Zylstra said in an email to The Herald.

Zylstra started creating art before he attended college in the 1970s.

“Fossil III”

Arts_downown3.jpg
“Fossil Ill” is a reminder of the important role bees play in the environment, according to artists Lin McJunkin and Milo White. The sculpture replicates nature with glass hexagons of aquamarine and spring greens fitted in metal forms. The hexagons resemble a honeycomb. Gary McCutcheon Courtesy

The city of Puyallup was designated a “Bee City” in 2016, and “Fossil Ill” is a reminder of the important role bees play in the environment, according to artists Lin McJunkin and Milo White.

The sculpture replicates nature with glass hexagons of aquamarine and spring greens fitted in metal forms. The hexagons resemble a honeycomb.

“It is our sincere hope that a solution is found to the Colony Collapse Syndrome experienced worldwide by beekeepers that is killing the chief pollinators of our food crops — caused in part by pesticide use and our warming climate — before bees become ‘fossils’ themselves,” McJunkin wrote in an email to The Herald.

McJunkin lives in Conway, Washington and has worked with glass for 40 years. White, from Sedro-Woolley, has worked in metal art for 10 years.

“Symbiosis”

Arts_downtown1.jpg
A dancer makes Puyallup her stage in “Symbiosis,” a steel statue made by Eugene, Oregon artists Mark Andrew and Randy Ortiz. Gary McCutcheon Courtesy

A dancer makes Puyallup her stage in “Symbiosis,” a steel statue made by Eugene, Oregon artists Mark Andrew and Randy Ortiz.

“Both of us have been excited to collaborate on this piece; we hope it will encourage passersby to stop and spend time enjoying the many elements we have included, the movement of the dancer in her little world and the mutually beneficial relationship between them,” Andrew wrote in an email to The Herald.

Andrew has created art for more than 40 years, and Ortiz 20 years.

Andrew’s stone carving “Salmon Spirit Speaks” was purchased by the city several years ago and sits in the garden at Puyallup City Hall.

“SOLAR WIND”

DSC_1016.jpeg
Gary McCutcheon Courtesy

“SOLAR WIND” will easily catch the eyes of passersby because it moves.

The 5-foot sculpture is made from 36 different-sized bicycle wheels configured around a large motorcycle wheel.

“The smaller wheels have disks of different colors attached to their spokes so as to make them into spinning windmills,” artist Patricia Vader said. “This wheel configuration sits atop a cylindrical pedestal made with a water heater and car wheels.”

Vader resides in the San Francisco Bay area and has been creating art for a decade.

“The Choice”

DSC_1019.jpeg
Artist Sharon Warman Agnor watches as her piece, The Choice, is installed in Pioneer Park. Joan Cronk Courtesy

“The Choice” is a 17-foot-tall sculpture made with stainless steel, bronze and cast glass and represents a caged glass egg. A bronze bird is perched on the top.

Artist Sharon Agnor from Vancouver, Washington learned how to weld when she was 48 at her local community college and has been sculpting for 17 years.

“‘The Choice’ asks the question, ‘How important are our choices when making our dreams come true?’” Agnor told The Herald. “... Whether on a personal, or community level, the realization of our dreams depends on the thoughtful choices we make.”

  Comments