Crime

Mixed success for prosecutors in Lakewood police killings

Pierce County prosecutors charged seven people with crimes in the aftermath of the killings of four Lakewood police officers by Maurice Clemmons, who a Seattle police officer killed two days later.

Here’s a rundown on what happened to those defendants.

• Rickey Hinton, Clemmons’ half-brother, was charged with rendering criminal assistance for allegedly helping the gunman flee after the attack. A jury acquitted him.



• Dorcus Allen, Clemmons’ friend and employee, was charged as being an accomplice to aggravated first-degree murder. A jury convicted him and he was sentenced to 420 years in prison.



The Washington State Supreme Court on Thursday overturned his conviction and ordered a new trial, saying a deputy prosecutor prejudiced him by misstating the law during closing arguments.

• LaTanya Clemmons, the gunman’s sister, was convicted of rendering criminal assistance for allegedly aiding Allen in the days after the attack.



The Washington State Court of Appeals later overturned her convictions and said they couldn’t be refiled because the evidence did not support them. She served about two years in prison before being released.

• Douglas Davis, who occasionally worked for Clemmons, was charged with rendering criminal assistance to the gunman and illegally possessing a gun Clemmons stole from Richards.



A jury acquitted him of the rendering criminal assistance charge, and the state appeals court later overturned his convictions for illegally possessing the gun. He served four years in prison before being released and is seeking compensation for wrongful incarceration.

• Eddie Davis, Clemmons’ cousin, was convicted of rendering criminal assistance to Clemmons after the shooting and illegally possessing Richards’ gun.



His conviction on the gun possession counts were overturned on appeal as was his exceptional sentence of 10 years, five months in prison. He remains in prison while the appeals process continues.

• Letrecia Nelson, Clemmons’ aunt, was convicted of rendering criminal assistance after the shooting and illegally possessing one of the slain officer’s guns.



The appeals court overturned her conviction on the gun possession charges and ruled she shouldn’t have received an exceptional prison sentence. She’d served her sentenced and had been released before the decision was reached.

• Quiana Williams, an acquaintance of Clemmons’, was the only member of the so-called Clemmons Seven who did not go to trial.



Instead, Williams pleaded guilty to rendering criminal assistance to Clemmons after the shooting and was sentenced to five years in prison. She’s served her time and been released.

  Comments