Crime

Police beat: A sister fight, a stubborn customer, and a driver with too much confidence

Editor’s note: Compiled from reports to Tacoma police.

July 26: Fights with strangers are bad. Fights with siblings are worse.

Two officers picked up a the dispatch call – a report of domestic violence at an address in the 1400 block of South M Street. They found two sisters with cuts and bruises, and a mother who had seen it all before.

One sister was 23. She said she came to the apartment where the other sister, 25, lived with Mom, 52.

The younger sister said no one ever helped Mom clean up. That included the older sister. Today was a cleanup day. The younger sister helped, she said. The older sister just kicked back on the couch.

The younger sister said no one ever helped Mom clean up. That included the older sister. Today was a cleanup day. The younger sister helped, she said. The older sister just kicked back on the couch.

The younger sister yelled at her do-nothing sibling, she said. The older sister got angry and sprayed her with a water bottle. That led to a wrestling match, broken up by a teen brother who left the apartment earlier.

The officer looked the younger sister over, and saw scratches on her arm and chest. He interviewed the older sister, who said her younger sibling came over today and started yelling and complaining as usual.

The older sister said she fired a stream from the spray bottle, and the younger sister charged and threw punches to the face.

The officer looked the older sister over, and saw a scratch on her arm and a golf-ball-size welt on her forehead.

He interviewed Mom, who said she was washing dishes in the kitchen when the fight started. The younger sister was louder and more aggressive, she said. She heard the sound of the scuffle, walked into the living room and yelled at her daughters to stop.

Mulling the situation over, officers decided the younger sister was the primary aggressor. They told her she was under arrest. She started crying.

On the way to the patrol car, the younger sister yelled at her mother, saying she always took the older sister’s side while the younger sister always got blamed for everything. On the way to the Pierce County Jail, the sister said she was bipolar and sometimes lost control of herself.

Officers booked her into the jail on suspicion of misdemeanor assault.

July 27: More often than not, calling the cops will persuade an unwanted customer to vanish.

It didn’t faze the 49-year-old woman, who kept pacing at the entrance of the convenience store, despite the owner’s pleas.

An officer drove to the address in the 1500 block of Martin Luther King Jr Way, and saw the woman immediately. She stepped out, looked at him, and said, “Yeah, I’m high. So what?”

An officer drove to the address in the 1500 block of Martin Luther King Jr Way, and saw the woman immediately. She stepped out, looked at him, and said, “Yeah, I’m high. So what?”

The owner, a 45-year-old man, pointed and said, “Her. I want her away from my store.”

The officer spoke to the woman and offered to give her a ride. The woman said no. She rambled. Asked for her name and date of birth, she declined to give either.

The officer called for medical aid. He stood at the entrance to the store. The woman tried to walk past him. He stopped her.

A medical aid team from the Tacoma Fire Department arrived. The woman refused assistance. The owner said the woman had walked in and out of the store for the past two hours, never buying anything, annoying other customers and breaking things.

The officer warned the woman three times that she needed to leave or face arrest. She made no move. He told her she was under arrest.

At the Pierce County Jail, the woman refused to give her name. Workers eventually found it by comparing previous booking photos. She was a regular. She was booked on suspicion of trespassing.

July 28: If your driver’s license is suspended, perhaps it’s reasonable to scoff that you don’t need it.

Still, maybe bravado has its limits. Maybe it’s not the brightest move to thumb your nose at the suspended license, pile five children in the car and take a drive, along with a slug of peach vodka.

Officers picked up the initial alert from a bystander at the intersection of South 66th and Tyler Streets. The man said he’d just seen a woman in a red Toyota Corolla slam into a traffic roundabout, flattening one of the tires.

The man said he tried to help. The driver, a 36-year-old woman who appeared to be drunk, got angry at him. The man also noticed five children in the back seat. The man had walked away to call police; when he got back, the car was gone, he said.

Officers found the 1998 Corolla a few blocks away, parked in an apartment complex. The woman was there. The children weren’t.

“Why you stopping me?” the woman said.

The officer noticed an empty 50-ml bottle of peach vodka on the floorboards.

Did the woman just get into an accident?

“My tire just buckled,” the woman said. “It just buckled.”

Had she been drinking?

“Yeah, just one shot.”

She reached into the passenger seat and pulled out a second, identical bottle, also empty.

“I just drank this at the park, that’s it,” she said.

How long had she been driving with no license? “Years. I drive better than all these people with licenses. Why do I need one?”

The woman said she had driven the kids to the park earlier: a daughter, her cousin, and two friends, ranging from ages 7 to 11.

“I was fine to drive,” she said.

The officer asked for the woman’s name. A records check revealed her suspended license.

Asked how it had been suspended, the woman said, “I’ve never had a license.”

How long had she been driving with no license?

“Years. I drive better than all these people with licenses. Why do I need one?”

The woman failed voluntary field sobriety tests. At Tacoma Police Headquarters, she took a breath test, and blew a 0.18, more than twice the legal limit. The officer booked her into the Pierce County Jail on suspicion of drunken driving and driving with a suspended license.

  Comments