Education

Seabury School forms new partnership with Korean educators

Korean educator Alex Im, center, works with Seabury fifth-graders Dylan Fong, left, and Anna Caplinger, to build a structure made of gumdrops and toothpicks that will support a heavy book.
Korean educator Alex Im, center, works with Seabury fifth-graders Dylan Fong, left, and Anna Caplinger, to build a structure made of gumdrops and toothpicks that will support a heavy book. Courtesy/ Seabury School

Seabury School has entered into a partnership with Korea POLY School, an English language institute, to bring North American-style gifted education to the students of South Korea.

Seabury, a Tacoma private school serving highly capable students from prekindergarten through eighth grade, will provide curriculum units and help train KPS teachers for the first phase of the project expected to launch in March.

KPS Director Alex Im visited Seabury in October, and in February, members of Seabury’s team will travel to South Korea to train KPS teachers.

"Cultivating a meaningful learning experience for each of our students is POLY's top priority,” said Im. “ A partnership with Seabury School ensures a genuine education for POLYstudents by promoting creative and critical thinking skills that will serve our students both in their classrooms and in their bright futures."

KPS provides afterschool programs for kids with advanced English skills. Many have studied in the United States.

“KPS has an interest in North American-style gifted education,” said Sandi Wollum, Seabury head of school. “They see that the kind of discovery-based, engaging, student-led learning that encourages complex thinking and problem solving, which is at the core of Seabury’s curriculum, is something that bright Korean students would benefit from.”

Five Seabury teachers spent time in Seoul in August 2014 for a pilot project teaching KPS second and third graders. The success of the experiment led to an agreement that was made final this year, Wollum said.

“We’re excited to have this opportunity to share our program with gifted kids on the other side of the globe,” Wollum said.

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