Outdoors

Adventure briefs for June 12

Duthie Hill Mountain Bike Park in Issaquah will be the site of the Evergreen Mountain Bike Festival Saturday and Sunday.
Duthie Hill Mountain Bike Park in Issaquah will be the site of the Evergreen Mountain Bike Festival Saturday and Sunday. Staff file, 2010

Mountain biking

Hit trails at Evergreen festival

The 2016 Evergreen Mountain Bike Festival will take place this weekend at Duthie Hill Park in Issaquah.

The Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance is hosting the event that will feature demonstrations, vendors, the chance to test ride bikes and ride the trails at the King County park.

The Duthie Hill Mountain Bike Park has 6 miles of cross-country bike trail, 2 miles of free-ride trail with jumps and built features, a central clearing with a shelter, kids’ biking area and more.

The event will be 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday. The park is at 26529 SE Duthie Hill Road, Issaquah.

While admission to the festival is free, a Clearing Pass to demo bikes and more is $10 for alliance members and $20 for nonmembers.

For more information, go to evergreenmtbfestival.com.

State Parks

Mount Spokane road closure

People heading to the east side of the state should note that road construction will close the Mount Spokane State Park Road for much of the summer.

The road to the summit and the park campground will be open until road work begins in the park in late June or early July, said Steven Christensen, park manager.

At that time, all roads beyond the park entrance will be closed seven days a week to motor vehicles with some exceptions into October.

Limited vehicle access will be allowed for people involved with preapproved activities as well as condominium owners, their guests and campers with reservations at the Quartz Mountain Fire Lookout, Christensen said.

The general public will have to hike or bike in from entrance points at Day-Mount Spokane Road, Bear Creek Lodge and Mount Spokane Park Drive near the ranger station. The campground will be open to backpackers.

All the trails will be open for nonmotorized use. The park’s normal hours are 6:30 a.m.-dusk.

Rich Landers, The Spokesman-Review

Conservation

Grants will aid fish projects

Two Washington projects are part of seven in the West to receive grants from the Western Native Trout Initiative.

The group recently awarded $214,242 in grant funding for seven community-based projects that benefit native trout species, according to a news release. The projects are funded through the National Fish Habitat Action Plan and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

One grant will involve DNA-based assessment of bull trout distributions in the Wenatchee River basin. The $34,695 grant will help assess the distribution of juvenile bull trout, an Endangered Species Act-listed species, in the basin using DNA sampling. The Trout Initiative will be working with the Wild Fish Conservancy.

The other grant will involve the design of a floodplain reconnection on Swauk Creek in Ellensburg, Cle Elum and Wenatchee. The $35,000 will fund in-stream and floodplain restoration work in conjunction with an adjacent highway project to replace two highway culverts, improving habitat for westslope cutthroat trout, rainbow trout and steelhead in this tributary to the upper Yakima River, according to a news release. The Mid-Columbia Fisheries Enhancement Group will be helping with the project.

The initiative is a multi-state, multi-partner working on the conservation needs of the native trout species found in 12 western states.

For more information about these projects, visit westernnativetrout.org.

Compiled by Jeffrey P. Mayor, jeff.mayor@thenewstribune.com

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