An endangered female orca leaps from the water of Puget Sound west of Seattle on Jan. 18, 2014. Restrictions on vessel traffic have helped keep more boaters farther from critically endangered southern-resident killer whales, while not harming the whale-watch industry, a new study has found.
An endangered female orca leaps from the water of Puget Sound west of Seattle on Jan. 18, 2014. Restrictions on vessel traffic have helped keep more boaters farther from critically endangered southern-resident killer whales, while not harming the whale-watch industry, a new study has found. Elaine Thompson Associated Press file photo
An endangered female orca leaps from the water of Puget Sound west of Seattle on Jan. 18, 2014. Restrictions on vessel traffic have helped keep more boaters farther from critically endangered southern-resident killer whales, while not harming the whale-watch industry, a new study has found. Elaine Thompson Associated Press file photo

Whale-watching industry is growing despite distance restrictions, according to study

December 27, 2017 07:30 AM

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