Commuters hop off the Link light rail train Tuesday at the University of Washington Tacoma campus while a bus drops off passengers at the Washington State History Museum in Tacoma. Sound Transit proposes spending $50 billion over the next 25 years to expand light rail, commuter train and express-bus services across the Puget Sound region. Some of that money would be spent to expand light rail from Federal Way to the Tacoma Dome Station and eventually on to the Tacoma Mall and Tacoma Community College. Voters would need to approve nearly $27 billion in new taxes this fall for the projects to move ahead.
Commuters hop off the Link light rail train Tuesday at the University of Washington Tacoma campus while a bus drops off passengers at the Washington State History Museum in Tacoma. Sound Transit proposes spending $50 billion over the next 25 years to expand light rail, commuter train and express-bus services across the Puget Sound region. Some of that money would be spent to expand light rail from Federal Way to the Tacoma Dome Station and eventually on to the Tacoma Mall and Tacoma Community College. Voters would need to approve nearly $27 billion in new taxes this fall for the projects to move ahead. David Montesino dmontesino@thenewstribune.com
Commuters hop off the Link light rail train Tuesday at the University of Washington Tacoma campus while a bus drops off passengers at the Washington State History Museum in Tacoma. Sound Transit proposes spending $50 billion over the next 25 years to expand light rail, commuter train and express-bus services across the Puget Sound region. Some of that money would be spent to expand light rail from Federal Way to the Tacoma Dome Station and eventually on to the Tacoma Mall and Tacoma Community College. Voters would need to approve nearly $27 billion in new taxes this fall for the projects to move ahead. David Montesino dmontesino@thenewstribune.com

New long-term taxes would pay for Sound Transit expansion

April 16, 2016 3:21 AM

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