Chen Guifang sits near the window in her apartment in Chongqing, China on Aug. 12, 2015. On May 4, 1939, 7-year-old Chen was huddled inside a crowded cave in Chongqing – China’s wartime capital in its southern interior – as Japan bombed the city for a second straight day. Shrapnel rocketed everywhere, wounding Chen and killing both of her parents. Nearly 12,000 died in the Japanese bombing of Chongqing during World War II.
Chen Guifang sits near the window in her apartment in Chongqing, China on Aug. 12, 2015. On May 4, 1939, 7-year-old Chen was huddled inside a crowded cave in Chongqing – China’s wartime capital in its southern interior – as Japan bombed the city for a second straight day. Shrapnel rocketed everywhere, wounding Chen and killing both of her parents. Nearly 12,000 died in the Japanese bombing of Chongqing during World War II. Yue Wu McClatchy
Chen Guifang sits near the window in her apartment in Chongqing, China on Aug. 12, 2015. On May 4, 1939, 7-year-old Chen was huddled inside a crowded cave in Chongqing – China’s wartime capital in its southern interior – as Japan bombed the city for a second straight day. Shrapnel rocketed everywhere, wounding Chen and killing both of her parents. Nearly 12,000 died in the Japanese bombing of Chongqing during World War II. Yue Wu McClatchy

World

August 27, 2015 10:00 AM

In Chongqing, scars of WWII are still visible – on people’s faces

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