Stella Keating, 11, snuggles her beloved collection of stuffed animals in her bedroom. Keating, a transgender girl, feels a particular kinship with the unicorns. “They’re picky. Once they choose something, there’s no going back, which is what I do a lot. They’re completely unique.”
Stella Keating, 11, snuggles her beloved collection of stuffed animals in her bedroom. Keating, a transgender girl, feels a particular kinship with the unicorns. “They’re picky. Once they choose something, there’s no going back, which is what I do a lot. They’re completely unique.” Drew Perine dperine@thenewstribune.com
Stella Keating, 11, snuggles her beloved collection of stuffed animals in her bedroom. Keating, a transgender girl, feels a particular kinship with the unicorns. “They’re picky. Once they choose something, there’s no going back, which is what I do a lot. They’re completely unique.” Drew Perine dperine@thenewstribune.com

Beyond bathrooms: How Washington pioneered protections for transgender students

July 30, 2016 01:00 PM

UPDATED August 08, 2016 02:48 PM

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