In this March 18, 2015, file photo, senators walk through the rotunda and toward the House Chamber to a joint session of the Washington state Legislature, in Olympia, Wash. During their last two budget-writing cycles, Washington lawmakers extended their 105-day sessions to last more than six months. Some lawmakers say those overtime sessions — along with lawmakers’ relatively low pay — make it difficult for everyday citizens to serve as legislators.
In this March 18, 2015, file photo, senators walk through the rotunda and toward the House Chamber to a joint session of the Washington state Legislature, in Olympia, Wash. During their last two budget-writing cycles, Washington lawmakers extended their 105-day sessions to last more than six months. Some lawmakers say those overtime sessions — along with lawmakers’ relatively low pay — make it difficult for everyday citizens to serve as legislators. Elaine Thompson AP
In this March 18, 2015, file photo, senators walk through the rotunda and toward the House Chamber to a joint session of the Washington state Legislature, in Olympia, Wash. During their last two budget-writing cycles, Washington lawmakers extended their 105-day sessions to last more than six months. Some lawmakers say those overtime sessions — along with lawmakers’ relatively low pay — make it difficult for everyday citizens to serve as legislators. Elaine Thompson AP

Can average people still serve in the Legislature when sessions go months beyond schedule?

July 19, 2017 08:00 AM

UPDATED July 19, 2017 06:28 PM

More Videos

  • Victoria Woodards leads early Tacoma mayor balloting

    Tacoma mayoral candidate Victoria Woodards shares her enthusiasm after early returns show her winning during an election-night party.